Relaxation techniques are an essential part of stress management. If you’re an overachiever, you may put relaxation low on your priority list. Don’t shortchange yourself. There are active ways of achieving relaxation. Relaxation is invaluable for maintaining your health and well-being, and repairing the toll that stress takes on your mind and body.

Almost everyone can benefit from learning relaxation techniques. Relaxation techniques help to slow your breathing and to focus your attention on the here and now. The concept of enjoying the moment we are living in, rather than being worried about what could happen in the future. Common relaxation techniques include meditation, mindfulness, tai chi and yoga. For a more active approach, walking outdoors or participating in a sporting sports activity can be relaxing.

Stress-reducing suggestions

Here are some techniques you can use to combat stress. It doesn’t matter which relaxation technique you choose. What matters is that you select a technique that works for you and that you practice achieving relaxation regularly.

  • Physical activity/Exercise
  • Massage
  • Meditation/Relaxation exercises
  • Yoga
  • Journaling
  • Tai Chi
  • Counseling
  • Art

Recognizing When It's More Than Stress

Most headaches are nothing to worry about. But if headaches disrupt your daily activities, work or personal life, ask your doctor for help. You may be stressed, but perhaps there’s something else going on as well.

Seek emergency care if your headache:

  • Is sudden and severe
  • Accompanies a fever, stiff neck, rash, confusion, seizure, double vision, weakness, numbness or difficulty speaking
  • Follows a head injury, fall or bump
  • Gets worse despite rest and over-the-counter pain medication

These signs and symptoms may indicate a medical condition that needs prompt treatment.  Call 719-589-8008 for more information about how to combat stress.

Understand the Impact of Long-Term Stress

Our ability to cope with the demands upon us is key to our experience of stress. For example, starting a new job might be a wholly exciting experience if everything else in your life is stable and positive. But if you start a new job when you've just moved into a new house, or your partner is ill, or you're experiencing money problems, you might find it very hard to cope.

How much of this does it take to push you "over the edge"? Not all unusual events are equally hard to deal with. For example, compare the stress of divorce with that of a change in responsibilities at work. Because of this, you need to be able to rate and measure your total stress score appropriately.

Use this tool to understand how stressful events in your life may be impacting your physical and mental health.

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